Early Fine Art Dealers buys original paintings by over 400 artists.

EARLY FINE ART DEALERS

Early Fine Art Dealers specializes in valuing and purchasing important paintings from the 17th century through the early 20th century. Our buyers are in constant search for fine works of art and paintings, spanning the globe for original well-known Old Master, European, American, and early California art. Each year we preview and participate in hundreds of private sales, art shows, gallery showings, exhibitions and auctions. We are in constant search for fine works to purchase. Please contact us today to discuss the sale of one of your paintings. Please note that our gallery only deals with original paintings. No Prints Please.



WE ARE DEALERS OF ORIGINAL PAINTINGS - To contact one of our gallery fine art experts about selling your painting or buying paintings for your collection, complete the form below. Please note that our gallery only deals with original paintings - No Prints Please.

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Jan II Vermeer van Haarlem (1628 - 1691)

A student of Jacob de Wet (an admirer and strong emulator of Rembrandt), painter Jan II Vermeer van Haarlem would instead paint landscapes unlike his teacher and many of his contemporary Dutch peers. He would work in the style of Ruisdael, whose cloud and landscapes, with their emphasis on light, shade, contrasts and composition, would heavily influence those of Vermeer.

Born in Haarlem, the Netherlands in 1628, Jan Vermeer II studied with de Wet from 1638 to 1648 before setting out on his own. By 1654 he would enter into the Haarlem Guild of St. Luke where his works began to demonstrate the influence of the more romantic style of painting taking place.

His landscapes began to become more panoramic rather than emphasizing a particular scene or setting, and his perspective altered to that of a high advantage, as in his dune scenes and coastal views. Additionally, his palette began to change as well during the later part of his life and his naturalist hues altered to a predominance of yellows and dark greens with heavier amounts of shadow.

His name is frequently confused with that of Vermeer van Delft, and with his descendents all named Vermeer van Haarlem, including Jan III Vermeer van Harlem.

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